800.843.3508 info@newlimeco.com

Mango

Tropical Import

Mango

[mang-oh]

Available: Year Round

Mangoes are the most widely grown and consumed tropical fruit in the world. They are cultivated in over 90 countries. Approximately 77% of mangoes are grown in Asia and India, about 9% in Africa, and about 13% throughout the Americas and the Caribbean Basin. Mangoes were introduced to the Americas during the 18th century. Many varieties of mangoes were actually developed here in Florida as part of a program to initiate the growth and expansion of a local effort to produce mangoes for export. At one time, approximately 7000 acres of mangoes were grown here in Florida. Since its peak in the early 1900’s, however, the Florida mango industry has declined. As a result of hurricanes, occasional freezes, and high competition from other growing regions, Florida’s acreage has been reduced to around 1000 acres. However, the largest single commercial importing country of mangoes is the United States. Mangoes have steadily been becoming one of the most popular fruits throughout the U.S. – that’s why they are available year round at New Limeco, LLC.

There are many varieties of mangoes cultivated throughout the Americas. The most popular commercial varieties are Ataulfo, Francine, Haden, Kent, Keitt, and Tommy Atkins. Mangoes can be enjoyed in a variety of ways. Many enjoy mangoes fresh, out of hand, and can be prepared by slicing away from the pit in two halves, then scored length ways and cross ways and then cut away from the skin. Enjoy mangoes in deserts, fruit salads, drinks, salsas, and chutneys. Mango chunks can be frozen for a refreshing treat or to be stored for later use. Ripen mangoes between 70º and 75º F and then store in the refrigerator for about a week.

Mangoes are available in 10 pound flats.

References:

Recent Trends in World and U.S. Mango Production, Trade, and Consumption
University of Florida IFAS Extension
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe718

Mango Growing in the Florida Home Landscape
University of Florida IFAS Extension
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG216

Mango History
National Mango Board
http://www.mango.org/pring.aspx?id=1104